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Saxon Heroines: A Northumbrian Novel

Seventh century England is a hodgepodge of warring Anglo-Saxon states filled with shifting alliances and treacherous grabs for royal power. Kings rise and fall, depending on Woden’s Luck. Northumbria, the damp kingdom north of the River Humber, is a state riven with rivalries and kings determined to expand at any cost. Women have no obvious role in a warrior society, but by using their wits, four women—two queens and two abbesses—make monumental changes.

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Recognition for Saxon Heroines

“…dramatically gripping novel…A captivating account of the lives of extraordinary women in perilous times.” — Kirkus

“a fascinating story of upheaval in early Britain . . . Historical fiction readers will be absorbed by this intricate tale of memorable Northumbrian women fighting for change.” — BookLife

[In] Saxon Heroines, we get to hear from the powerful women of the early medieval world. Well researched, well detailed, and a compelling story make it an enjoyable fresh take on medieval historical fiction.” — Alex Telander, Manhattan Book Review

“[A] brilliant recreation of the lives of inspiring heroines from seventh-century Northumbria.” –Readers’ Favorite

“Old gods fall as Christianity rises across Northern Europe with a fair amount of help from the women behind the scenes, the wielders of true power.” — Chanticleer Reviews

Two Coins: A Biographical Novel

The Great Scandal of British Calcutta

It’s 1883, and newspapers are flying off the shelves in Calcutta, Edinburgh and London. Mary Pigot, lady superintendent of the Scottish Female Mission in Calcutta, has been charged by The Reverend William Hastie with mismanagement and immorality, and she’s fighting back! Also available as an audiobook.

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Recognition for Two Coins:

Praise for Two Coins

…when the trial starts, its momentum resembles that of a competitive sporting event. Wagner-Wright’s extensive research allows her to stay remarkably true to history while her creativity brings an outstanding story of courage and fortitude to life. A powerful story with a vivid setting, compelling plot, and multifaceted characters.

Kirkus Reviews

Rama’s Labyrinth: A Biographical Novel

Rama pushed against a labyrinth of isolating false starts. Engulfed by controversy, without resources, and determined to fight death, Rama built a home for famine victims. Would this be her labyrinth’s center or another dead end? Also available as an audiobook.

 

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Cleanly written, subtle in the treatment of intimacies, with excellent sensorial immediacy, Rama’s Labyrinth is a weekend’s engaging pursuit.

Five Stars – David Lloyd Sutton, San Francisco Book Review

Sandra Wagner-Wright

Sandra Wagner-Wright holds the doctoral degree in history and taught women’s and global history at the University of Hawai`i. When she’s not researching or writing, Sandra enjoys travel, including trips to India, China, and St. Petersburg, Russia.

Sandra particularly likes writing about strong women who make a difference. She lives in Hilo, Hawai`i with her family and writes a weekly blog relating to history, travel, and the idiosyncrasies of life.

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